Teachers Lesson Plans

Photographic Links

Cubism
Cubism
Definition: Cubism was a term coined in 1908 by Louis Vauxcelles to describe the modern art of Picasso and Braque. These artists refuted traditional perspective and broke the planes of the composition into interlocking facets thereby fragmenting and disintegrating the image.

Daguerreotype
Daguerreotype
Definition: Daguerreotype is an early photographic process. It depended on long exposure time and bright light and was recorded on a silver plate. It was invented by Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre in 1837.

Darkroom
Darkroom
Definition: Light-tight room used for processing or printing.

Gelatin silver print
Gelatin silver print
Definition: A positive image composed of silver particles held in a binder layer of gelatin on paper. This technique was used to make contact prints and enlargements from negatives from the late 1870s. Gelatin silver enlarging papers continue to be widely used for back-and -white photographs today.

© Miriam Grossman Cohen

Metaphor
Metaphor
Definition: One thing conceived as representing a thing ordinarily designates one things is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison.

Photomontage
Photomontage
Definition: Photomontage, is a collage technique, was invented by the German artists after World War 1. They combined details of diverse photographs into new compositions, thereby creating work with a strong social political message.

Still-life
Still-life
Definition: Picture of inanimate objects. Common still-life subjects could be vessels, food, flowers, books, usually dead animals and clothing. A still-life painting can also be a symbol for the fleeting aspects of life. The Dutch painters of the seventeenth century excelled in creating still-life paintings.

Surrealism
Surrealism
Definition: A twentieth century movement that was founded by the French writer, André Breton (1896-1966). The movement was influenced by the theories of the psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud. Surrealist works are as confusing and as startling as those of dreams. These works can be realistic, but be totally irrational in their depiction of dreamlike fantasies or they can be abstract. If they are abstract they are usually modeled upon the psychotherapeutic procedure of ?free association?. In this process, conscious control is eliminated in order to express the unconscious.

View camera or Field camera
View camera or Field camera
Definition: View camera or Field camera is used for making large-scale negatives, especially of outdoor scenes and architectural studies. In the nineteenth century, the plates were exposed and the contact printed rather than enlarged.

Wet plate collodion
Wet plate collodion
Definition: This process was invented in 1848 by Frederick Scott Archer. The wet plate collodion process became the prominent method of production of negatives on glass in the nineteenth century. The exposure time was shorter and became a lot mote popular than the previous methods and processes. It replaced the one of a kind daguerreotype. Wet-collodion on glass negatives were also popular for their high resolution of detail.